Images Index> Matlock Bath, 20th and 21st Century Images> This page
Matlock Bath: The Rutland Arms & Masson Mill
Matlock Bath : Twentieth Century Photographs, Postcards, Engravings & Etchings
 
Photograph of Masson Mill, Boston House and the Rutland Arms
20th & 21st C Images
Next Image
Previous Image
More Matlock Bath Pictures
18th & 19thC
"Just" Images
Matlock Bath
General Info
About Matlock Bath
Find a Name

Arkwright
Arkwright & his Cotton Mill


Woodbank, 1910


Masson Mill's Water Wheel, about 1930



Masson Mill ad 1946



Here is the second of two photographs, taken in the early twentieth century, showing the buildings opposite Arkwright's red bricked Masson Mill (also see the previous image) although the Mill is the main focus here. The limestone crags of Cat Tor are behind the mill, on the opposite side of the River Derwent.

This photograph is probably the slightly later of the two as some of the shrubbery is fractionally bigger. The words on the banner displayed outside Boston House differ slightly from those on the previous image, too: Matlock Bath | Cyclists | Rest | Beds. Cycling had become popular and cycle groups used to visit Matlock Bath every weekend.

There are two things that help date the picture, both mentioned by Benjamin Bryan in 1903. Bryan writes that, following the transfer to the English Sewing Cotton Company in 1897,"a factory chimney of red brick has since been erected, and the high wall which screened the mill from the road pulled down[1]". This photograph shows the newly built chimney and the wall has gone.

The identity of the two boys is not known; they might be locals or, equally, they could be trippers from Derby or Nottingham.


Photograph in the collection of and provided by and © Ken Smith.
Image scanned for this website and information written, researched by and © Ann Andrews.
Intended for personal use only.

References (coloured links go to on site transcripts):

[1] Bryan, Benjamin (1903) "History of Matlock - Matlock, Manor and Parish" London by Bemrose & Sons, Limited, p.267